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Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
to beat president obama. a look at the war in afghanistan. now the longest war. how do we get out? does obama's policy differ from president bush's and what is the effect for generations to come? joe and mika and willie join in the conversation later this hour. we begin with the debt crisis. they are trying to make a deal on the deficit. houses of congress are rolling out separate compromises to safe off a default. harry reid is meeting with mitch mcconnell to craft a solution to appeal to both parties. according to reports, this would do the following. it would allow the debt ceiling to be raised three times for a total of $2.5 trillion. in exchange, some $1.5 trillion in spending cuts would be enacted. the plan would be established to identify new deficit cuts. proposal, already, getting a lukewarm response from the fellow republicans. among them, the freshman snar mark arubio and tom coburn. take a listen. >> it gives the president the ability to raise the debt limit. the debt limit isn't the problem. the problem is the debt. the plan, as outlined to me isn't a credible solution. >>
in afghanistan that the top u.s. commander is now calling unfathomable. the half brother of hamid karzai gunned down in his own home. ahmed wally karzai was an influential figure inside afghanistan and a very controversial one who had deep connections with the white house. let's bring in our pentagon correspondent chris lawrence. lots at stake here as well, chris. what do we know? >> wolf, afghans who have been complaining about corruption in the afghan government probably will shed no tears at the death of ahmid wally karzai. on the other hand, he helped hamid karzai exert fouer down in the south in kandahar where the president probably would not have been able to exert that power. so his loss british columbiaens karzai at a time when negotiations with the taliban move forward and it also may have very big repercussions for the u.s. effort in the south. people called president hamid karzai's brother a corrupt gangster. but the cia's former head of counterterrorism says the u.s. may miss him. >> it's quite like live that what follows is going to be something that will not work to our interest.
on jobs in baghdad, kabul, kandahar, in other parts of the iraq and afghanistan. and the irony of course is that we are being told that we are in this terrible crisis, when the republicans brought out a military bill that increased the military by $17 billion, gives more money to iraq and afghanistan, and i have to say i am very nervous that the president might agree to keep troops in iraq next year, which is longer than george bush wanted to keep them there. so, yeah, i think we can in the short-term save a lot of money by bringing the troops home with no negative job impact. but to get back to your question, what mr. bernanke said correctly is, yes, over the long-term, you should have a plan for deficit reduction from both higher taxes in my judgment and spending cuts. but in the short-term, if you were to do that, you would slow down the recovery. and that's why it's a timing issue. >> in terms of what you just said there about defense cuts, and what might be possible in this congress, i feel like the things that i have heard from republicans that seem like they have sort of silver li
's got to step in? i've been here. i've been doing afghanistan and bin laden and -- the greek crisis. >> he has a point, if you go by the number of bills passed. through the first hall of this year, 2011, how many bills become law? 18. 15 of those laws named a building after somebody, extended an expiring law or appointed an official to the smithsonian institute. counting all them, 18 laws, this year's not so big number. >>> up next, kansas is inching closer to an all-out ban on abortion. the state approve as new set of regulations critics say is aimed at shutting down all abortion clinics. all three of them in the state. we're hear from both sides. >>> you're watching "hardball" on msnbc. i made. when i got my medicare card, i realized i needed an aarp... medicare supplement insurance card, too. medicare is one of the great things about turning 65, but it doesn't cover everything. in fact, it only pays up to 80% of your part b expenses. if you're already on or eligible for medicare, call now to find out how an aarp... medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare i
still in iraq and afghanistan, he has a rough road ahead. he told military families they are on the top of his agenda. >>> steven colbert started a superpac. it's part of a spoof on campaign finance laws but the hearing is real. he can use his show to produce ads. >> i'm reminded as we stand here of the pilgrims who on this very spot, but in massachusetts, filed their papers to form clement pack, to be free of the tyranny of king george who refused to allow a single corporate on u.s. presidential elections. >> i don't remember that from my history book. today in washington, republicans are taking things personally. hitting back at the president who laid into them for planning to go home next week on break instead of working on a budget deal. >> so maybe if he would take a valume and come down and talk, it might be helpful. >> it's the kind of language you expect from a leader of a third world country, not the president of the united states. >> frankly, he should be embarrassed. unfortunately, the threshold of embarrassment here in washington is different than the rest of the world. >> i
because of iraq and afghanistan those views are shifting. that invisible wounds, mental wounds, psychological wounds, are just as debilitating and in some cases more debilitating than losing a arm or leg. gwen: what is it about these wars that's different from other wars in changing people's opinions about that? >> part of it is the sheer number of tours. you have people going three, four, five, six times to these war zones. and part of the nature of the war itself. in world war ii, you had big battles where the guys to your left and right of you were shooting at enemies. and it was more of a conventional fight. in iraq and afghanistan, you could be walking as has been the case where i've been there, and a person who's a friend of yours suddenly disappears in an i.e.d. you never see the enemy who took his life. a very different kind of challenge. you are constantly afraid of something bad happening. and you never know who the person is who's doing that bad thing to you or the person you care about. >> yochi, does the policy change affect benefits in a way that needed some deep
about afghanistan and what it calls men and women to serve and what they do so. let's look at this story. the deficit battle is favoring the gop. we will see house some of this plays out this week. : is thetion today is constitution still relevant? now to the democratic line with lawrence from new jersey. welcome. caller: thanks for taking my call. >> is the constitution still relevant? i don't think it does. most americans don't know anything about the treaty of kent. it says to return things to the way they were before. we established the federal government, the irs, and federal income-tax. anniversary ofe 2 the signing of this treaty. rights will be taken away. host: here's a comment from twitter. here's another comment on twitter. let's take a look at some final numbers. this is from culpeper, virginia. thanks for all your calls this morning. we will be back in a few moments talking about topics ranging from white people serve in the military to what americans think about patriotism. we will be right back. >> ♪ >> today on c-span, the dalai lama and vincent harding talk about non-v
as the u.s. is pulling out of iraq and afghanistan. >> reporter: well, just take a look at what's happening in baghdad today, jon. you have the iranian vice president who's arriving with a high profile delegation to baghdad to meet with iraqi prime minister nor i al-maliki, a fellow shia muslim, they're trying to build relations, and listen to senators joe lieberman and lindsey graham, who just returned from afghanistan: >> the biggest nightmare for the ayatollahs in iran is to have a democrat -- democracy in iraq and afghanistan on their borders so yes, they're helping the taliban, they're trying to react to debate that shia are trying to bring down democracy, they're trying to undermine their efforts. they're responsible for material coming into both countries that are killing not only american soldiers but the rec -- iraqi and afghan people. >> they've got the blood of a lot of people on their hands, including the hundreds of americans who have been killed in iraq as a result of iranian training and equipping of extremist militias. >> reporter: but i just asked general david rodriquez, w
revenue in terms of what we are spending. $120 billion alone in afghanistan. alone. that doesn't include aid. 47, 000 troops still in iraq and we have tax cuts in place. >> the united states is strategically overextended worldwide. what are we doing borrowing money from japan and europe and persian gulf. we are overextended. >> exactly, pat. >> the country is overextended. you can't start fighting wars and not raise the revenue. >> maybe you ought to end the war. >> here we go. we have to do a little bit of everything. >> let's do one plan. we talk about both sides in broad strokes. walk us through what is actually inside the deficit reduction plan on each side. >> fair enough. >> simpson sets the standard. they came out with $4 trillion in deficit reduction. the paul ryan plan got about the same amount of deficit reduction, $4 trillion. the obama plan is $2.5 trillion of deficit reduction. the biden talks that have been going on are at zero, really, but they are talking $1 trillion spending cuts, maybe. by the way, even if the plan were adopted, we have $6 trillion more debt ten years f
, which sounds like a lot. but includes money not spent in iraq and afghanistan. which republicans are likely to argue are not true cuts. so, whose plan will prevail? boehner told his fellow house republicans, i think we can win this for the american people but that it's going to require some of you to make some sacrifices. if we stand together as a team, our leverage is maximized and they have to deal with us. that last comment was probably directed at the republican members who have said that they will not vote to raise the debt ceiling under any circumstances. speaker boehner will need their volts if he wants his legislation to win out in what is shaping up to be a partisan showdown. rebecca? >> nancy cordes on capitol hill. thank you, nancy. if a deal does not happen, how does that affect most americans? joining us is roben farzad, senior writer for bloomberg news. what's the ripple effect on average americans if this thing doesn't happen? >> mostly psychological throughout the week. if people suddenly start perceiving that the unthinkable of, one, credit rating downgrade for t
.s. involvement in afghanistan, pakistan and iraq has cost up to 4 trillion dollars over the past decade. your reaction to that? >> i think that study is badly flawed for a number of reasons. it's counting costs we would have incurred anyway for the existence of the military. it does focus on the potential explosion of medical costs. that is something i think even defenders of the defense department have said for some time that is an area of cost cutting we ought to be looking at. badly flawed but there are points worth taking into account going forward. >> gregg: unless anyone thinks we forgets, more than 6,000 american lives in various wars over the past decade, hundreds of thousands have been injured. ambassador john bolton, happy independence day and thank you so much for taking the time. >> thank you. happy 4th. >> heather: it appears that new york city's budget woes are far-reaching. the city will have to shut down the swimming pools and summertime programs. david lee miller looks how the money crisis will hit the youngest residents? >> we're not just talking about new york city, a natio
afghanistan is also winding down and that's the trillion dollars they thought they'd save but they don't list anything with the harry reid plan and not to look at entitlements, how could you possibly say we're taking a hard look and making tough decision abouts the future of our -- of the country economically and not look at entitlements when even the president of the united states has had a problem. let's look at john boehner. he says, all right, i'll raise the debt ceiling. this is what i mean by a two phased plan. just a trillion dollars and we'll have $1.2 trillion in cuts by the end of the year. the future cuts will be commissioned and sent up after they commission a bipartisan panel to decide, you know, republicans or democrats to decide which will be cut and what shouldn't. >> and apparently, it would be along the lines of the cut, cap and balance as you can see right there. here is something that speaker boehner said why he cannot support the democrats' plan. he said the administration says they need all of the increase up front so he doesn't have to deal with this until after the ele
in iraq, or afghanistan, by maintaining our current level of troops for the next ten years and nobody believes we'll maintain the current level of troops we have in iraq, or afghanistan, for the next ten years, so, this is phony savings, as is the claimed half trillion dollars in interest savings by not spending the trillions we weren't going to spend otherwise. alisyn: there are reports, obviously, the president invited congressional leaders, democratic and republicans, to the white house tomorrow and there are also reports out yesterday, "the new york times," that the white house has agreed to cut in entitlements. and, sounds like there may be progress, and, room to open the debate? >> there could be, but the question about the entitlement cuts is, are they real? are they likely to be realized and are they sooner rather than later? the president, we need to be on a glide path but for example the president offered, again, from my discussions with people who are knowledgeable about these discussions, between the white house and the congress, is they've offered a trillion dollars worth
in afghanistan and i spoke to a very senior norwegian government official and he described the man as a neonazi and they are finding it very difficult to believe this was just his work alone. this was a very sophisticated and coordinated attack, and in addition to the shooting, they think maybe two or three bombs in the city center and powerful bombs. the truck bomb from the building and friends i talked to in oslo say the radius went out to 1,000 meters that windows were sheeterred and they believe there was a second bomb not baitsment of the building where the prime minister's office was so very sophisticated and well coordinated attack. >>clayton: an attempt to assassinate the prime minister there who was expected to give a talk, today, at the youth camp where we hear reports that there could have been other bomb materials found at the catch, as well. when you talk about "naive." what do you mean? >>guest: very good and humble "for my people" and one of the best allies we have, but a very humble people. they have supported peace. that is home of the nobel peace prize and they never thought a
for ten years in iraq and afghanistan. >> ainsley: major, you have just accomplished so much in your life, you're new a pastor and an author, you've written this novel. tell me about your book. >> "fallen angel" about a special operations team, written like it happened yesterday or could happen tomorrow. a u.s. intelligence satellite is shot out of the sky and every country in the world would lo of to have the technology on board and the u.s. sends guys to get it, but of course, they realize there are other can't that will do what they have to to get a hold of the technology and special operations goes in to get the technology and fighting for their life. >> ainsley: you've been to battle and a lot of people watching, getting ready to go to church on sunday morning and you're a pastor, what is your message to get through life. >> i they will audiences i'm a soldier who has been shot at. i know what it's like to be scared and when you go through fear, it's genuine faith in jesus christ that helps you get through. and financial problems, family problems whatever you're going through. my mes
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)

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